Category Archives: community

shop update

It’s been a bit quiet around here of late as we’ve had both our mothers in Europe! I spent a couple of weeks travelling with my mum, both in Spain where I joined her to walk a small part of the Camino (she walked a good third of it- amazing and inspiring at 77!) and then in London… it was so lovely to see her and six days of walking was a perfect way to both catch up with what we’ve both been up to and on news from home but also to get to know each other in different ways- I’d really recommend it! (in case you’re interested, I only took my phone camera with me but you can see a handful of pictures on my Instagram feed)

And then Scotto’s mum came to spend a week with us- we had a lovely time showing her our new neighbourhood and then spending a few days on the west coast of Scotland- we based ourselves in Oban and explored the surrounding coastline, including a trip out to Mull and on to Iona… It was just an introduction to this stunning region and we are planning a trip back in a couple of weeks to visit Staffa and Lunga to see the thousands of nesting seabirds, including PUFFINS! (I’ll definitely post photos from that trip!)

Yesterday’s shock announcement that the UK will exit from the EU has left many people here reeling and I must say that I feel very sad about the decision and unsure about the shape and colour of the future for the UK, Europe and the world in general… It’s already an uncertain time for many and that is surely only going to increase now. In light of that and having been away from work, I’ve found myself feeling a bit disconnected from what I’ve been working towards- so it is definitely time to get back to it! There is so much to catch up on and I’m working on quite a few little projects which I’ll be revealing over the next few days but, for now, I just wanted to mention that I’ve added some pouches to the shop… they’ll be available tomorrow, Sunday 26 at 12pm Glasgow time, but you can have a sneak peek now if you’d like!

This is a soft little group of colours and, as usual, a mix of Harris Tweed and other fabrics and a variety of sources….

Pouches

Pouches

 

purple4

Lovely vintage lilac and pink twill from my friend Anna

A subtle dark tan and oatmeal wool

A subtle dark tan and oatmeal wool

This is the last of this lovely vintage wool tweed

This is the last of this lovely vintage wool tweed

Beautiful fabric from Ted Baker trousers found by my friend Jeni

Beautiful fabric reminiscent of night cityscapes, originally Ted Baker trousers found by my friend Jeni

Wishing you a peaceful weekend and, wherever you are, community and a sense of purpose xx

shop update

Just a wee heads-up that I’ve just added a good handful of pouches to the shop! There’s a lovely range of sources and vintages in this group; some great, well-loved Harris Tweed jackets that I brought back from Australia at Christmas-time (including one particularly old one) an well-loved garment from my generous friend Anna, vintage campervan seats, upholstery offcuts… I always enjoy putting disparate fabrics together to make an interesting but cohesive group- and pairing 1940’s HT with a charcoal and red Smiths-esque check was particularly fun!

Tweed pouches

Tweed pouches

Vintage Harris Tweed

Vintage Harris Tweed

1970's Harris Tweed

1970’s Harris Tweed

Anna's Oma's skirt

Anna’s Oma’s skirt

Lairy check

Lairy check

I hope you love these fabrics as much as I do!

dye workshop: nettle, coreopsis, elder and logwood

Another group of newbies got a taste of natural dyeing a couple of weeks ago… as always, I was too busy setting up and then teaching to get any photos of the workshop itself but here are the results from our dye baths…

Samples of silk velvet, silk habutai, cotton and linen

Samples of silk velvet, silk habutai, cotton and linen

We worked with both protein and cellulose fibres and four plants that display some important  aspects of the dye process: nettle as a readily-available, weedy species with a strong affinity with different mordants; dyers coreopsis, a flower that is easy to grow and requires very little processing to extract its dye compounds; logwood extract for easy, quick colour and elderberry for its crazy colour response to pH change. (I’d also hoped to use iron to modify some of our logwood samples but had a scale malfunction and the samples were WAY too dark to show any further colour modification!)

Nettle on silk velvet, silk, habutai, cotton and linen

Nettle on silk velvet, silk habutai, cotton and linen

Nettle on organic merino, mordanted with alum, copper and iron

Nettle on organic merino, mordanted with alum, copper and iron

Nettle on organic merino on a series of different wool yarns, all mordanted with alum

Nettle on a series of different wool yarns, all mordanted with alum

coreopsis2

Dyers coreopsis on silk velvet, silk habutai, cotton and linen

coreopsis2

Dyers coreopsis on organic merino, mordanted with alum, copper and iron

coreopsis2

Dyers coreopsis on a series of different wool yarns, all mordanted with alum

logwood1

Logwood on silk velvet, silk habutai, cotton and linen

logwood1

Logwood on organic merino, mordanted with alum, copper and iron

logwood1

Logwood on a series of different wool yarns, all mordanted with alum

elder1

Elderberry on silk velvet, silk habutai, cotton and linen; we dyed extra samples of silk velvet and habutai and then treated them with acid (upper) and alkali (lower) in order to demonstrate the influence of pH on the colour achieved from anthocyanin-rich plants (middle)

elder1

Elderberry on organic merino, mordanted with alum + acid, alum, alum + alkali, copper and iron

As always, it was interesting to see how different fibres took up the dyes; I was particularly interested to try a yarn base with two strands of merino and 1 of superwash merino (third from the left in the bundle), as it is commonly thought that superwash yarns take up dye more readily and are less able to hold onto the colour over time. So it was fascinating to see that, while that proved true in this case, the degree of difference in colour uptake seems to depend on the dye! It definitely needs more work but it certainly looks like there is more difference in colour in the coreopsis sample than in the others…

And I was thrilled to get such strong blues on wool using the logwood extract, because dyeing with indigo, while a magical and essentially simple process, requires a lot more work to set up (and a bit tricky in an indoor rental space!). The downside is that logwood is not as colourfast as indigo but using an iron modifier will greatly improve fastness…Something to play around with more.

Logwood on organic merino over dyers chamomile

Logwood on organic merino (over dyers chamomile)

If you are interested in learning more about plant dyes, there are places available in my next class on June 19 at the Glasgow Botanics Kibble Palace; you can find more information through my shop.  And, bonus, here will be so many plants to try by then!

classes, shop update and newsletter

Just a wee heads-up that I have a few classes coming up, as well as a shop update!

I’m back teaching at two of my favourite knitting shops again this month:
 
Sunday April 3: Finishing and Introduction to Lace at Ginger Twist Studio, Edinburgh
Saturday April 23: Portuguese knitting at Queen of Purls, Glasgow

I’m also really excited to start preparing for this year’s natural dye workshops at the Kibble Palace, Glasgow Botanics! The first couple of classes on Sunday May 1 and June 19 will be full-day introductions to natural dyeing and will cover the essential practical and theoretical aspects of extracting colour from plants and applying it to fibres. Later in the summer, I hope to hold more advanced classes for those keen to delve deeper into the dyepots… You can find details and book through the shop.

Tweed pouch

Tweed pouch

Shetland Pine Cowl

Shetland Pine Cowl

Tweed pouch

Tweed pouch

A good handful of pouches and cowls will be up for grabs from 10am Glasgow time on Sunday April 3.

Alongside these regulars will be a small number of craft journals that were a collaborative project between Emily K. Williams of Flutterby Knits; after taking a class in bookbinding at last year’s Shetland Wool Week, my Shetland room-mate Emily approached me with the idea of combining skills and making a knit-covered journal for craft project notes and planning. An exclusive for Edinburgh Yarn Festival, these few are the last left of a lovely joint project!

Also launched at Edinburgh was a small collection of plant-dyed yarns: fine-gauge blends of beautiful, soft-handed fibres including alpaca, silk, linen and cashmere. I was thrilled with the response to them and will be adding yarns to the shop on an ongoing basis. I have a small number of skeins left and will be adding them to the next shop update in a few weeks.

Plant-dyed yarns

Plant-dyed yarns

In case you haven’t noticed, I’ve added the option of signing up for a monthly newsletter to my sidebar, as I’ve been finding my diverse activities a bit hard to juggle here and on other social media platforms! If you’re interested, you can keep up with what I’m up to through my monthly newsletter outlining not only what I’m up to but also any related things that I think you might be interested in.

I hope you are have a lovely spring (or autumn) weekend!

spring

Without us even realising, spring has arrived! After all the preparation for Edinburgh Yarn Festival and then the joy of the actual weekend itself (more on that soon!), it feels like I’ve now stopped to look around and everything has changed… the daylight lasts two hours longer than it did a couple of months ago, we all have a spring in our step, the tiny birds are out collecting for their nests and calling at all hours and there are green shoots everywhere!

Buds

Buds

Fresh green leaves!

Fresh green leaves!

Tiny bundles of larch needles

Larix decidua: European Larch

Cercidophyllum magnficum: Katsura

Cercidophyllum magnficum: Katsura

japmaple

Acer palmatum ‘Sangu-kaku’: Coral-bark Maple

We recently moved and are lucky enough to now overlook the river Kelvin (just a ten-minute walk along the river to the Botanics!) so those shoots are whispering promises of the green cathedral that will be on our doorstep in just a few weeks… and, although we are so excited about the idea of all that green, we can’t quite believe it will actually happen! I’m wondering if that is just because we’ve only had one spring here or if it is another expression of the human capacity to forget all but the physical state we are currently in? Perhaps part of the reason that the ancients performed midwinter rituals to recall the sun back to them was because they didn’t quite believe that it would return of its own accord! We haven’t been ritualising but we certainly have been willing the sun to come… For those who’ve grown up in cold climates, te’ll me, do you begin to remember the seasons as you see years pass?

The early spring flowers are certainly nudging us to remember the colourful beauty of last year’s warmer months…

Salix sp: Willow

Salix sp: Willow

cornus

Cornus mas: Cornelian Cherry

Gold

Forsythia sp.

Narcissus pseudonarcissus: Daffodil

Narcissus pseudonarcissus: Daffodil

Flowering currant

Ribes sanguineum: Flowering Currant

We were lucky enough to head out on Good Friday with one of Scotland’s great foragers, Mark Williams, to learn about recognising and harvesting wild foods which shows that, even this early in the growing season, there is plenty of stuff out and about!

I hope you’re enjoying the swing of the seasons, wherever you live xx