Tag Archives: Glasgow

shop update

Hello! It’s been quite a while since I’ve had a chance to sit down and write here… I really wish I’d been able to make time to do so as I love sharing a little of what I’ve been seeing and doing but I suppose we all have to prioritise activities and this year has been so full of lots of wonderful travels that I this little place has not got a look in. And I know I’m not alone is feeling that, somehow, the longer between posts, the harder it seems to get back to write one. But I do have a couple of plant and dye posts in the works and more waiting and hope to share them with you over the next couple of weeks! In the meantime, I just wanted to let everyone know that I’m adding some pouches to the shop tomorrow…

A plethora of pouches

This is a cheerful bunch, made up of some of Lorna‘s beautiful handwork (that has been so loved by many of you- thank you!) and a few special fabrics. I’ve slowly worked my way through my lovely collection of worn-out jackets (and have also been doing a lot more plant-dyeing) and, as a result, my pouch-making has slowed down this year… I see this as a natural part of the way I work- there are only so many beautiful Harris Tweed jackets out there needing a new life and my focus has always been to do just that, to find a purpose for waste. But I stumbled on some beautiful (new) fabrics that I wanted to highlight in a short run of pouches, this time from Peter Grieg of Kirkcaldy, the same mill that weaves the linen I use to line my pouches. They are made from lambswool so are a softer fabric than HT but are based on some of the old Scottish tweeds and tartans and make a lovely juxtaposition to it.

Benmore Red from Peter Grieg (L, M and S)

Ancient Robertson (L and M)

As you can see, I’ve also expanded my range to include three sizes of pouches! Over the last couple of years, I’ve stored up some larger scraps so, when Rachel of Daughter of a Shepherd asked whether I’d be able to make some different sizes for our collaboration, it seemed like a great time to start using them. Because of the way I work, not all sizes are available in every fabric- it really depends on what size pieces I have- but I do have quite a few of each size in this update. My standard pouch is now my M and I’ve added a S (perfect for notions or needles) and a L (fits a medium shawl project or a baby garment) and they are £26, £23 and £30 respectively.

Harris Tweed (L and M)

And the other special fabric in this update is this wonderful hot-pink and green wool boucle!

Josh’s wool boucle

I was lucky enough to be contacted by Josh, a Dutch knitting friend from Instagram, offering me this wonderful vintage wool boucle- it had formed part of her godmother’s treasured fabric stash until her recent death and Josh really wanted to find a way to honour her and her stash and wondered if it might work as pouches. I held it back for a while, unsure if it was a bit thick for the purpose, and then realised that the gauge of the fabric would work really well as a larger pouch. And it does- the combination of that hot-pink/ grass-green/ sage check and the plump, dense fabric has made super cosy pouches and I love them!

So that’s the update. Please do head over and have a look if you’re interested- they are available for preview now and for sale tomorrow evening, Friday December 1 at 8pm Glasgow time. (For any overseas buyers keen for delivery before the holidays, please get in touch after making your purchase to discuss postage- as a guide, a small parcel containing up to 3 pouches tracked to Australia/ US costs £12.95 and takes an estimated 7-10 days. Please note that, while it’s almost certain to arrive by December 24, I can’t guarantee delivery!)

Many thanks for your interest!

spring

Without us even realising, spring has arrived! After all the preparation for Edinburgh Yarn Festival and then the joy of the actual weekend itself (more on that soon!), it feels like I’ve now stopped to look around and everything has changed… the daylight lasts two hours longer than it did a couple of months ago, we all have a spring in our step, the tiny birds are out collecting for their nests and calling at all hours and there are green shoots everywhere!

Buds

Buds

Fresh green leaves!

Fresh green leaves!

Tiny bundles of larch needles

Larix decidua: European Larch

Cercidophyllum magnficum: Katsura

Cercidophyllum magnficum: Katsura

japmaple

Acer palmatum ‘Sangu-kaku’: Coral-bark Maple

We recently moved and are lucky enough to now overlook the river Kelvin (just a ten-minute walk along the river to the Botanics!) so those shoots are whispering promises of the green cathedral that will be on our doorstep in just a few weeks… and, although we are so excited about the idea of all that green, we can’t quite believe it will actually happen! I’m wondering if that is just because we’ve only had one spring here or if it is another expression of the human capacity to forget all but the physical state we are currently in? Perhaps part of the reason that the ancients performed midwinter rituals to recall the sun back to them was because they didn’t quite believe that it would return of its own accord! We haven’t been ritualising but we certainly have been willing the sun to come… For those who’ve grown up in cold climates, te’ll me, do you begin to remember the seasons as you see years pass?

The early spring flowers are certainly nudging us to remember the colourful beauty of last year’s warmer months…

Salix sp: Willow

Salix sp: Willow

cornus

Cornus mas: Cornelian Cherry

Gold

Forsythia sp.

Narcissus pseudonarcissus: Daffodil

Narcissus pseudonarcissus: Daffodil

Flowering currant

Ribes sanguineum: Flowering Currant

We were lucky enough to head out on Good Friday with one of Scotland’s great foragers, Mark Williams, to learn about recognising and harvesting wild foods which shows that, even this early in the growing season, there is plenty of stuff out and about!

I hope you’re enjoying the swing of the seasons, wherever you live xx

orchids

I just came across a series of photos I took in one of the Glasgow Botanics glasshouses early this year…

It was not long after we first arrived in Glasgow, perhaps late March, so the weather wasn’t hugely cold but the wafts of warm air that engulfed me as I wandered around the glasshouse were so heavenly and very reminiscent of home. I’ve never been into orchids (I think the frenzy of orchid collectors freaked me a bit!) but was struck by the huge variety in form, colour and origin to be seen in the house. That variety, combined with the inviting warmth, meant that I’ve been back a few times to visit the collection but it was only yesterday, in the relative cold of early winter, that I really relived that sense of ahhh on walking into the house. I think it might become a regular part of my winter walk…

A few details that captured me on my first visit:

Stems

Bamboo-like stems

Stem and growing point

Stem and growing point

Pseudobulbs

Pseudobulbs

New plant forming

Growing a whole new plant

Virus

Beautiful patterns formed by a virus

Dendrobium

Dendrobium

Pink throats

Pink throats

New flower spikes

New flower spikes

Arpophyllum or Hyacinth Orchid

Coming into flower

Arpophyllum or Hyacinth Orchid

Explosion of colour

Orange teeth

Orange teeth

Orchid

Hanging beauty

Sublime

Sublime

Sublime

Detail

Close up

No doubt there’ll be more featured here over the winter!

dye workshop results

Yesterday I held a day-long workshop in dyeing with plants at the Glasgow Botanics. We worked with a single dyebath of madder, in my eyes one of the loveliest dye plants around, and explored the variety of colours you can achieve from this one bath through the use of different mordants, modifiers and fibres. Each time I teach this class, I see different results! Participants made organic merino yarn and silk fabric shade cards, whereas I dyed a few small skeins and fabrics to expand on the variety of textures and shades…

A few of my favourite results…

Madder on silk, wool and other fibres

Madder on silk, wool and other fibres

Madder on cellulose and silk fibres results in beautiful terracottas and pinks, while on protein fibres, oranges, rusts and reds. I was particularly excited to see a true red on a skein of alum-mordanted Jamieson and Smith Shetland Supreme- normally I’d expect to have to play around with pH to achieve a true red but this was a neutral bath so it must be the type of fibre that resulted in that fantastic shade…

Madder on cotton lace and Shetland yarns

Madder on cotton lace and Shetland yarns

Madder on Shetland (previously dyed with Prunus sp) and Falkland fibre

Madder on Shetland (previously dyed with Prunus sp) and Falkland fibre resulted in rust shade

Madder on organic merino with various pre-and-post treatments, tannin/ alum-mordanted cotton and silk velvet and yarns of various different sheep breeds

Organic merino with various pre-and-post treatments (front), tannin/ alum-mordanted cotton and silk velvet fabrics (middle) and yarns of various different sheep breeds (top)

I also added a stunning piece of embroidery to the bath, one that I’d found at my lucky charity shop where I find so many treasures. It was such an incredible piece of work that I was a bit unsure whether to do so, especially after one of the participants, an very talented embroiderer, confirmed that it was highly unusual and skilled work! But the combination of sheer silk base fabric and denser cotton shadow-work was begging for colour to highlight the embroidery so I popped it in!

Stunning thrifted embroidery piece- silk base fabric with cotton shadow work

Thrifted embroidery piece- silk base fabric with cotton shadow-work

Thrifted embroidery piece- silk base fabric with cotton shadowwork

Thrifted embroidery piece- silk base fabric with cotton shadow-work

It is a little patchy so needs another dip but I’m so thrilled with how it picked up that dusty terracotta colour. Such amazing work.

As part of the day, we took a walk around the gardens in the rain, looking at some of the plants growing there that yield dyes and some of the markers that tell you that a plant might hold dye potential, and it was such a treat to have not only the bed dedicated to dye plants but the entire gardens themselves as a teaching resource. I’m planning to hold more similar workshops there in the spring, by which time I should have more burners, pots and a bounty of foraged dyestuff that participants can really get their hands wet with! A huge thanks to everyone who came yesterday and, if you’re interested in coming to another, keep an eye out here and on Instagram for announcements of dates  : )

saxifraga

I discovered a tiny Holi festival going on in the neighbourhood this morning! From here, these beautiful little Saxifraga x urbium or London Pride (what a great name!) don’t look all that colourful…

Saxifraga x urbium

Saxifraga x urbium

But look a little closer…

Saxifraga x urbium

Saxifraga x urbium

Saxifraga urbium

Saxifraga x urbium

And you’ll see!

Saxifraga x urbium

Saxifraga x urbium

Aren’t they beautiful?! I completely fell in love with this sweet little plant but had no idea what it was. At first glance, I thought it might be a crassula of some kind as the flowers kind of resemble each other. But a bit of hunting and it turned out to be a saxifrage, a species that I vaguely remembered from my days as a herbalist but knew absolutely nothing about. So many plants to discover! There’s a lot of it in my neighbourhood, mostly planted amongst the rocky edges of tenement front gardens, and I’ll definitely be seeing it differently now!

There are so many details that you just can’t see unless you get in close.

The chunky, juicy style topped with delicate stigma, patiently awaiting pollen…

Saxifraga x urbium

Saxifraga x urbium

Those beautiful, coral-salmon, pollen-bearing anthers…

Saxifraga x urbium

Saxifraga x urbium

And that way that, once the anthers have fallen from the top, the filaments retract to form a series of rays between the petals…

Saxifraga x urbium

Saxifraga x urbium

And the summer mornings, with their long sunrise and soft, gentle light, make it easy to capture some lovely details, even for novice photographers like me, even though I know nothing about my camera’s manual settings.

How about you? Caught any nice details recently?